1. aUDIOMAPS.




Process  Akai Desktop Samplers | Eight Track Porta-studio | Record Decks and Knackered Records | A Music Box | A Megaphone | Voice | Bass 


Field recordings and collaged soundscapes that are filtered, re-sampled, looped, re-configured and re-constructed. Audiomaps is often collaborative in the recording, remixing and performative stage. Texts are ‘cut ups’, overheard conversations, ‘found' statements, declarations. Part manifesto at times.

Loops. Samples. Sequences. A whisper. A sense of place.

The very recent work is a direct response to the strange ambience that lockdown brought; March, April 2020. I had to find ways to keep working that were within the strict 'rules'. So, walking and cycling I always had a recording device on me to collect field recordings…

I had set up a 'lo-fi' studio at home so in April 2020, I 'composed' these pieces via very clunky desktop samplers (embracing the limitations of sample length imposed by this fairly archaic technology), an eight-track digital recorder, a mono synth and a box full of toy instruments...

So, the initial 'feeling' was one of ambience, separation.

The more recent pieces from lockdown January 2021 have an altogether more oppressive feel. Almost malevolent, I think. Very dark, highly contrasted imagery and quite visceral samples and sequences in terms of the audio.

“People tend to play in their comfort zone, so the best things are achieved in a state of surprise, actually.” — From Brian Eno


“People ask me, 'Don't you ever run out of ideas?' Well, in the first place, I don't use ideas. Every time I have an idea, it's too limiting and usually turns out to be a disappointment. But I haven't run out of curiosity.” — From Robert Rauschenberg


FOUR TESTS FOR TESTING TIMES.
aUDIOMAPS. (RE-imagined).








Mark

2. BAD CHOREOGRAPHY



Process Falling over | Lying face down | ‘Balancing acts’


You get to that point sometimes where you need to take things back to basics. Being able to work quickly. Spontaneously. These photographs are playful. How much ‘awkward and clumsy’ can I choreograph? Falling over, lying face down, ‘balancing acts’ (sic). No tricks here. No athleticism. The humour is dry. Pathos wriggles just under the skin.

I’m conscious but my thoughts are blurred. Somewhere else.
Occupied. Swamped. At breaking point.
Sleep is the dead weight of concrete boots that take half the day to shake off.
Wake up! Wake up! Wake up!
Walking with a rhythm slowed and slurred by middle age
A creaking and clicking downsizing human frame.
I try to keep up…
I heard the news today, oh boy.
Why. When. How. Did we get here?

“ I started playing around, and thought it would be quite interesting to get on them. I was thinking about how the plinths affected me; I tried to let the plinths determine where I put my foot or my arm. It became a pose work, an action that I did throughout the day. Somebody photographed me and I liked how that looked. People always think it’s lampooning Henry Moore, but I actually did that with a piece called Fallen Warrior, where I’m lying on the beach .” — From
Bruce McClean. Pose Work for Plinths 3.


“I think humour is used a lot of the time to keep people from getting too close. Humour side-steps and shifts the meaning.” — From Bruce Nauman.


If I’m honest, I’m having fun with this. And why shouldn’t I?





Mark

3. CAN YOU HEAR ME NOW?



Process Joy | Fear | Desire | Guilt | Sadness | Disgust | Delight | Anger

A collaborative installation by Stephen Carley and Anna Mawby. Curated by Andrea Hadley-Johnson.

A mixed-media, anthropological framework. Experimental and participatory. Joy, Fear, Desire, Guilt, Sadness, Disgust, Delight and Anger.

Two exciting years of intricate planning, development and collaboration. A period of studio time that felt like a creative research project.

CYHMN? was installed and exhibited at Derby Museum and Art Gallery between March and June 2012.

Oh god. Is thing on?
Test test test test test test
Can you hear me now?
As we come to the close of our broadcast day
This is my farewell transmission.

— From Shellac – The end of radio


Exhibition Review





Mark

4. CONSTRUCT DECONSTRUCT
    RECONSTRUCT



TANDEM VIDEO DRAWING ONE.
Sticks and wire.
Remixed 2021.



DRAWING BOOK ONE.
Book made 2017.
Video recorded 2021.


SCULPTURE AS DRAWING.
Paper, string, adhesive tape, detritus.
Variable dimensions.
Date unknown.


Process Line, Shape, Mark, Sequence. Collage, Layered. Action/Gesture. Press, Gravity, Weight. Drawing. De-collage.


Drawing is absolutely integral to my studio practise. The process informs and underpins all my work. For me, drawing is not about representation, it’s more a gathering and ordering of a collection of memories. Half seen, overlooked fragments, fleeting moments. It’s where marks, surfaces, shapes, lines and textures coalesce. Entirely process orientated and risky, it becomes a dialogue with the materials.

These drawings are a consequence of walking through and out of the city, cycling up steep hills and past old factories. Periphery vision through the window of a speeding train. Late night motorway car journeys. Things at my feet, the sky above.

“Drawing is the primal means of communication, which predates and embraces writing and functions as a tool of conceptualisation parallel with language.” — From Deanna Petherbridge, The Primacy of drawing.


The directness and immediacy of drawing is where I am at my most playful. Mark-making, cutting, ripping, punching holes, slicing, embossing. Often the images challenge the notion of what a drawing is or can be…

“A discourse between definition and the unresolved, the systematic and chaotic, certainty and speculation.— From The Good Drawing, CCW Bright 7




DRAWING TESTS SET ONE.
Nine possibilities.
Drawing, acrylic paint, ink and detritus collage on paper.
Each panel – 10cm X 10cm.
2020.

CONSTRUCT DECONSTRUCT RECONSTRUCT 1.
Drawing, acrylic paint, ink and detritus collage on paper.
200 X 200cm.
2018.

DRAWING TESTS SET TWO.
Nine possibilities.
Drawing, acrylic paint, ink and detritus collage on paper.
Each panel – 10cm X 10cm.
2020.

BLACK DETRITUS DRAWING.
Found objects / detritus. String, wire, cardboard, gloss paint, MDF.
200 X 200cm.
2017.

DRAWING TESTS SET THREE.
Nine possibilities.
Drawing, acrylic paint, ink, monoprint and detritus collage on paper.
Each panel – 10cm X 10cm.
2021.

CONSTRUCT DECONSTRUCT RECONSTRUCT 11.
Drawing, acrylic paint, ink, photograms and detritus collage on paper.
200 X 200cm.
2019.



TANDEM VIDEO DRAWING 2.
Paper.
Remixed 2021.



CONSTRUCT DECONSTRUCT RECONSTRUCT 2.
Drawing, acrylic paint, ink and detritus collage on paper.
130 X 110cm.
2018.

CONSTRUCT DECONSTRUCT RECONSTRUCT 3.
Drawing, acrylic paint, ink and detritus collage on paper.
130 X 110cm.
2018.

CONSTRUCT DECONSTRUCT RECONSTRUCT 4.
Drawing, acrylic paint, ink and detritus collage on paper.
130 X 110cm.
2017.

CONSTRUCT DECONSTRUCT RECONSTRUCT 5.
Drawing, acrylic paint, ink and detritus collage on paper.
260 X 220cm.
2017.

CONSTRUCT DECONSTRUCT RECONSTRUCT 6.
Drawing, acrylic paint, ink and detritus collage on paper.
130 X 110cm.
2017.

CONSTRUCT DECONSTRUCT RECONSTRUCT 7.
Drawing, acrylic paint, ink and detritus collage on paper.
130 X 110cm.
2017.

CONSTRUCT DECONSTRUCT RECONSTRUCT 8.
Drawing, acrylic paint, ink and detritus collage on paper.
130 X 110cm.
2017.

CONSTRUCT DECONSTRUCT RECONSTRUCT 9.
Drawing, acrylic paint, ink and detritus collage on paper.
130 X 110cm.
2016.

CONSTRUCT DECONSTRUCT RECONSTRUCT 10.
Drawing, acrylic paint, ink and detritus collage on paper.
130 X 110cm.
2016.

CONSTRUCT DECONSTRUCT RECONSTRUCT 12.
Drawing, acrylic paint, ink and detritus collage on paper.
50 X 50cm.
2019.



DRAWING BOOK TWO.
Book made 2017.
Video recorded 2021.


Mark

5. FINDING LINES




Process Here in this Space | X Marks the Spot           


fig one.

HERE IN THIS SPACE. X MARKS THE SPOT
THE CENTRE. THE PLACE
TO START AND END.

fig two.

REFLECT REWIND. PAUSE REPEAT.
REFLECT REWIND. PAUSE REPEAT.
REFLECT REWIND. PAUSE REPEAT.
REFLECT REWIND. PAUSE REPEAT.

fig three.

ABSTRACT MEMORY. REMNANT A TO B
STONE MUD CLAY SOIL
THE LAY OF THE LAND
THE LAY OF THE LAND
THE LAY OF THE LAND
THE LAY OF THE LAND

fig four.

DELINEATE . THIS LINE
AN OUTLINE. LINES THAT CONNECT US TOGETHER.


Finding Lines – a celebration of marks made and lines drawn.

New work from Liz Atkin, Stephen Carley, Nick Parker and Susan Kester alongside loaned work including pieces by Pablo Picasso, LS Lowry and Henry Moore. Finding Lines moved from an invitation to notice and capture the lines around us into a provocation to ‘find your lines and make your mark’, to reclaim the joy of drawing.

The resulting exhibition is a lively arrangement of drawings kindly loaned by partner organisations and freshly crafted works by five inspiring artists.

“A drawing is simply a line going for a walk.” — From Paul Klee



Virtual Tour


Mark