And so to Sheffield...
A studio at Blast Lane and an exhibition at الصفحة الرئيسية The Graves Art Gallery, 1989.
Part of 90 days in 89.

After a short period of trying to survive on the dole, I found part-time work at Granville College, Sheffield.
Helped pay the rent and fund the studio...
A kind of lo-fi anti aesthetic was driving my work at this time.
And I was sort of interested in sculpture...
But, it was a little unconventional and sort of charmingly 'cack handed' - wall paper, silver foil, bin bags, plastic, brown paper, yellow dusters... Sewn and glued together, to construct giant reclining donkeys, a 'soft' castle, a siege machine - something that looked like it was from the Flintstones and a suit hand crafted from black bin liners (I'm sure the label I made for inside the jacket collar was a self portrait passport photograph, me wearing a sailors hat)...
Almost as soon as the work was installed it started to sag and fall apart.
Something I hadn't anticipated at the time.
But, it was probably the first time I had (inadvertently) touched on the idea that work need not be permanent and that the process was probably more important (and probably more interesting) than the finished item.
And, not for the first time (and certainly not the last) the work caused some controversy, in particular the piece called 'colostomy catastrophe'... basically it was probably about an impending shit storm of some sort, but was misconstrued by the secretary of the local colostomy association as a piss take...
Some degree of notoriety was achieved (local press), the secretary of the colostomy association was reassured my intentions were global (David Alston at The Graves was very professional) and Andy Grey and myself had an enjoyable afternoon putting together some 'publicity' shots.
The only remaining elements of these pieces are a few of the violins.
The rest was put into temporary storage which subsequently flooded... Hey ho.
alt : http://www.stephencarley.co.uk/files/graves-sound.mp3